Parents: what to expect from Allison Chow, teen therapist

I’m here to help you solve problems and create a harmonious home, not blame you or your loved ones.

When parents first bring their teen to therapy, they often say things like:

  •  My kid makes me feel out of control.
  • I feel like my kid hates me.
  • We've tried therapy before.
  • Will my teen carry these behaviors into adulthood?
  • What can I do about my teen’s poor choices?
  • I don’t understand my teen.

But I trust that you know your teen better than anyone – even if you don’t currently trust yourself.

I typically see clients one-on-one. But in the case of teen therapy, I ask parents to get involved. Parents are so important to teens (even if you don’t always feel that way). And your teen is important to you.

As a team, parents and a therapist work towards common goals. My job is to act as an unbiased third party.  I will offer emotional and practical support through transitional periods, great crises or just difficult times.

Parent-therapist teamwork looks different for each family. Throughout the process, I respect you, your house rules, and your parental authority. We will work together to create a plan that fits your family’s needs and is therapeutic for your loved one. 

happy-teen-couple-using-tablet-47958566.jpg
I am not afraid of storms for I am learning how to sail my ship.
— Louisa May Alcott

Parents: How can you get the most out of Seattle teen counseling?

  • Schedule appointments consistently and arrive on time.
  • Treat yourself gently.
  • Do something kind for yourself to “fill your emotional cup,” so you can give more to your teen.
  • Seek parenting resources. Ask me for suggestions, talk with other parents, or browse my blog or the parenting section at your local bookstore or library. 
  • Ask questions. I am available to you and your teen.  Feel free to contact me at any time.

Remember — you’re modeling a healthy coping skill, by asking for assistance when you need help.


The young always have the same problem - how to rebel and conform at the same time. They have now solved this by defying their parents and copying one another.
— Quentin Crisp